It is currently Sep 20th, '18, 05:30

All times are UTC + 10 hours [ DST ]




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 11 posts ] 
Author Message
PostPosted: Dec 20th, '17, 17:50 
Offline
Midshipman

Joined: Nov 19th, '17, 18:53
Posts: 3
Has thanked: 0 time
Have thanks: 0 time
i have a small problem which is turning into a big problem,
and i really could use some help from some one with the knowledge


basic run down, im extremely poor and cant afford to get a marine engineer
to help me with this , ive asked several people and all have given me different
advice , none are willing to actualy come and give me a hand


I need some one to physicaly come out to my boat
and help me with greatly improving the alignment of my engine to prop shaft,


its a small kubota engine that was put in last year in a rush situation,
and it wasnt done properly ,
its in a Columbia 27 that i live on ,
the alignment is out by several mms
every thing shakes and there is tight spots when turning the shaft,
no good for going any sort of distance,and hasnt been used in this state


it also has a flex plate,
cant take it out of the water ,cant afford it, just need help improving it
but i am making it worst by playing around with it as i dont know what im doing ,
it does my head in looking at it so im asking for some help

im looking for a good samaritan that who knows about these things
and would be willing to come out to my boat and help me adjust it ,
and get it much better than it is ,
im also under pressure to be movable by after christmas,


ive tryed several times to adjust it but the simple fact is these
things arnt realy my skill set and my health conditions make it difficult also,


just throwing this out there on the off chance that some one would be able and willing to come out for a few hours of there time and help me ,
must be some one out there whos a good bloke?


i cant afford to pay you , mite able to get you some beers
but i really am in a tough spot ,
just hoping theres a some one who could help me out


please email me
if you know about inboards and have done these before !
cheers

boat is in thorneside , bay side brisbane,


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Dec 20th, '17, 18:34 
Offline
Admiral

Joined: Nov 5th, '06, 13:07
Posts: 5808
Images: 12
Has thanked: 1285 times
Have thanks: 605 times
Your wasting your's and other's time trying to sort the alignment out in the water.
You are right about not being able to improve it by yourself.

It needs to have the shaft removed and checked whether its bent. If its bent it can be straightened in a press.

Then you have a good chance of assembling it and getting the lot aligned for life. From the sound of it, the engine mounts and other gear needs checking while its up and dry.

Keep mucking about with it in position and your likely to do more harm, rip the shaft seal out and you can sink the yacht. From the sound of it, its not safe to use as is.

The cheapest way forward is to haul the yacht out and pay a marine engineer to fix it. I can't provide financial advice.

_________________
RL24 Mk4 cruiser Mariner 5 2 stroke

A bad day in the Whitsundays is better than a good day at work. Unless you work in the Whitsundays.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Dec 20th, '17, 18:40 
Offline
Admiral

Joined: Nov 5th, '06, 13:07
Posts: 5808
Images: 12
Has thanked: 1285 times
Have thanks: 605 times
I forgot to mention you did not say much about the change of engine.

If the engine was changed like for like, the change would have been simple but if the engine was different, things like the propeller shaft and propeller should have been checked. Again the engine change over needed to be done out of the water so the shaft and rear bush could be checked.

_________________
RL24 Mk4 cruiser Mariner 5 2 stroke

A bad day in the Whitsundays is better than a good day at work. Unless you work in the Whitsundays.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Dec 20th, '17, 18:43 
Offline
Admiral

Joined: Nov 5th, '06, 13:07
Posts: 5808
Images: 12
Has thanked: 1285 times
Have thanks: 605 times
Be very careful about letting a good samaritan try and fix it in the water.

You can't half fix the problems to good enough.

Its either correct or faulty.

Anything less than correct is unsafe.

_________________
RL24 Mk4 cruiser Mariner 5 2 stroke

A bad day in the Whitsundays is better than a good day at work. Unless you work in the Whitsundays.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Dec 21st, '17, 12:55 
Offline
Midshipman

Joined: Nov 19th, '17, 18:53
Posts: 3
Has thanked: 0 time
Have thanks: 0 time
the engine was another of the same there was no change of systems,
its just it wasnt aligned properly the first time cause i didnt know how to do it properly
it can be done in the water, it just needs some one who actualy knows how to do them properly ,
i dont under stand the process


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Dec 21st, '17, 13:30 
Offline
Admiral

Joined: Nov 5th, '06, 13:07
Posts: 5808
Images: 12
Has thanked: 1285 times
Have thanks: 605 times
The process starts with removing the propeller shaft, checking it is straight then putting the flange on the shaft and turning the face to make sure it is flat.

Then the skeg bearing is generally changed and reamed to suit the shaft.

Then the rear of the engine is turned against a dial gauge to determine the centerline of the crankshaft.

Marine enginees will then aim the engine at the rear bearing, I don't know how they do this these days, a laser tool would be a simple method.

Then the shaft is installed and the gap between th flange and the engine drive flage will be checked. Minor adjustments might be needed.

The only people who will do it properly will do it out of the water.

You asked, the above is roughly the answer.

If you don't like the answer, that is not my problem.

Most people on this site use outboards to avoid this type of problem and our yacht generally sit out of the water.

_________________
RL24 Mk4 cruiser Mariner 5 2 stroke

A bad day in the Whitsundays is better than a good day at work. Unless you work in the Whitsundays.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Dec 21st, '17, 13:57 
Offline
Inshore Skipper
User avatar

Joined: Sep 7th, '16, 11:16
Posts: 144
Location: Perth WA
Has thanked: 7 times
Have thanks: 34 times
INMA is right, most people here use trailers and outboards, post your post on Seabreeze sailing forum.
Good luck anyway, hope you get it sorted.

_________________
Sonata 8


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Dec 27th, '17, 21:51 
Offline
Inshore Skipper
User avatar

Joined: Jan 31st, '12, 16:11
Posts: 185
Images: 0
Location: Brunswick Heads
Has thanked: 189 times
Have thanks: 26 times
Gees,--------- I just typed a long explanatory reply and it disappeared. Not doing it again.
Have to disagree with Greg (Inma) and Gezza. It is BEST to do alignments in the water. My first job after my apprenticeship was at the Ballina Slipway and Engineering Co Pty Ltd. We NEVER did final alignments on the slip. Always in the water especially with new boats. I've done many alignments and the first thing is to make sure the shaft has no bends, either inboard or outboard. Next is to check the coupling faces for run-out. This can all be done in the water by disconnecting from the gearbox, clamping a machined sleeve cut in halves to the shaft in front of the inboard bearing. Check the two halves are exactly in line with a straight edge. If all faces are true and no bends in shaft you have to pack/unpack the engine to align until the faces are exactly parallel and outside diameters are exactly aligned with each other. Use feeler guages and straight edges. Check the back end of the shaft and propeller for bends first.
I put a lot more in the first reply, but you'll have to do it yourself as I'm at Brunswick Heads, otherwise I'd help you.
Cheers, Pete.

Edit to add: Also check for burrs on the coupling faces. I've seen big hammer marks on coupling edges that have to be removed carefully with a file until you have smooth surfaces.

_________________
Farr 6000 "Just Farr Me"


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Dec 28th, '17, 01:11 
Offline
Admiral
User avatar

Joined: May 9th, '07, 02:05
Posts: 9857
Images: 1
Location: Bayside Melbourne
Has thanked: 241 times
Have thanks: 1038 times
Pancho 43 wrote:
Gees,--------- I just typed a long explanatory reply and it disappeared. Not doing it again.
Have to disagree with Greg (Inma) and Gezza. It is BEST to do alignments in the water. My first job after my apprenticeship was at the Ballina Slipway and Engineering Co Pty Ltd. We NEVER did final alignments on the slip. Always in the water especially with new boats.

Hulls change shape subtly depending upon how they are resisting gravity; pressure over the entire surface of the hull or point loadings on a sling or stand?

_________________
A man's boat is his Castle. The Gippsland Lakes are my moat. Castle 650 #10, Roller Coaster.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Dec 28th, '17, 02:03 
Offline
Admiral

Joined: Nov 5th, '06, 13:07
Posts: 5808
Images: 12
Has thanked: 1285 times
Have thanks: 605 times
Pancho, agreed but in this case, it seems nobody has checked the propeller shaft is straight. With your larger installations, I'd be surprised if the maintenance and checks on the shaft were not done while out of the water. Or at least checked with dial gauges in position before disassembly.

There is a comment that the current shaft drags in one position which makes me think its probably bent. In addition machining the face of the flange is also a good starting point before working on the alignment.

I know you know a lot more about these things than me but trying to get this one aligned when you don't know the condition of the shaft and flange seems like a bad situation about to get worse.

_________________
RL24 Mk4 cruiser Mariner 5 2 stroke

A bad day in the Whitsundays is better than a good day at work. Unless you work in the Whitsundays.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Dec 28th, '17, 08:03 
Offline
Yachtmaster
User avatar

Joined: Oct 29th, '06, 00:55
Posts: 2582
Location: Somerville Victoria
Has thanked: 25 times
Have thanks: 336 times
Used to muck around with inboard ski boats so have unskilled experience. Seems to me something (probably the prop shaft)is bent if there is a tight spot.

_________________
Farr 7500 (Circe') Sold. Avan Camper, 1967 MGB roadster, 1932 Austin 7 Sports.


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 11 posts ] 

All times are UTC + 10 hours [ DST ]


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group