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 Post subject: Cruising with dogs
PostPosted: Oct 21st, '17, 22:11 
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6 years, 4 months, and 9 days ago, Wonderful Wife adopted a dog. A purebred Australian red terrior, mistreated and unwanted. I must admit, it added a new dimension when I retired, in more ways than walking. Damn Dog has been to NZ 3 times, Tasmania once. Puts up with riding in the motorhome, ( read land-yacht ), hates cattle grids, not happy with rail crossings. Does not like swimming, hates waves on the beach.

But it makes sailing a whole new game. Won't just lie down in the shade and relax. Oh no, wants to be on the high side, between me and the coaming. Slides around if we heel too far. I put some artificial grass on the cockpit floor, but no, it likes the real stuff, which I guess is our fault, but that was before we got back on the water.

About 50 boats in Horseshoe Bay at Magnetic Island, and about 10 had dogs, mostly small like ours, but all ashore twice a day. We talked a few other minders, how do they cope at places like the Whitsundays, where almost every island is a National Park. A variety of answers, but they all had bigger boats for a start. How do you guys get on ? Did I read somewhere about 2 greyhounds ?

Peter

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 Post subject: Re: Cruising with dogs
PostPosted: Oct 21st, '17, 23:04 
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I assume you are referring to my two hounds! Ann and I are insanely attached to them so they do interfere with sailing quite a lot.

The full story is that until a few years ago, we thought we had found the perfect sailing set-up, being a big, stable, comfy South Coast 25 in mast-up storage at the Gippsland Lakes. Then I developed a health problem that made it very hard for me to sleep on a boat or in a caravan as I needed to walk around in the small hours. So sadly the SC25 had to go and we adopted our second batch of two greyhounds.

Still needing a sailing fix at times, I bought a tiny CAL14 and we continued to rent a dog-friendly house at the lakes which also had a jetty at the bottom of the garden. The dogs could be left unattended for 5 or 6 hours, so we did some day-sailing that way.

Then the rental house became a bit run down and we lashed out and bought a tiny holiday house on Raymond Island instead. Then recently I had another brain fade and bought a lovely Investigator 563 (my third one) and the plan is for it to live at the lakes and the CAL will be the local pottering boat at home. Who knows how that will al work, but it is a plan.

The dogs probably have at least 5 years left in them, so hard to say what we will do when they depart - too far ahead and who knows what my health will be doing by then anyway. But please let me know if you can think of a way to sail with two greyhounds. Somehow I think they might just be the least suitable dogs for sailing, but the most suitable dogs for companionship and exercise as far as we are concerned. So it is a clash of passions and the dogs are winning the war at the moment.

Good luck with your pooch in your efforts to adapt to doggy sailing. :) Plenty of people do manage it - mainly with small dogs.

This image sums up what greyhounds think of yachts.


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 Post subject: Re: Cruising with dogs
PostPosted: Oct 22nd, '17, 09:52 
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Hi Peter,

When my father decided it was time for him to go and live in a nursing home he looked to me to arrange that for him and other personal matters. His little then 15 y.o. Maltese Terrier, Snowy, needed to be looked after so my younger brother volunteered to do just that. Unfortunately Snowy has some behaviour issues thanks to dad. He likes to eat in the evenings and usually needs to go "do it" around midnight. Strange, my brother could not cope with that so the dog got passed on to me. Walking with a 95 y.o. is very different with walking with someone that likes to almost jog whilst walking. Snowy was/is used to sniffing at every blade of grass. That would not do for me. So three years later I am still in the process of weaning him off weeing on every blade of grass. But you can teach a dog new tricks, well so they say.

Last year I could not palm him back to the family when I wanted to go sailing so I took him with me. I sail on my own and frankly having a dog to talk to is not such a bad thing. The little dog was really good company and he seemed to be gaining his sea legs very well. He did not panic as the boat healed. He was happy to sit between my feet and he did not need to "do it" whilst on the boat. He slept on a dog bed on the floor of the cabin and he really was no trouble at all. His best moments were at McDonalds at Lakes Entrance. All those sweet girls feeding him chips and cooing "oh how cute." He seemed to be in his elements. I was even approached by girls asking if they could brush him. So the brush had to be handy and close by.

During that trip there was a mishap though; and you really have to be aware that sometimes Sh...t happens.

It was a glorious day, just the right wind speed and the direction was really fantastic to sail from Lakes Entrance back to Paynesville. So after a nice watering and a long walk at L.E. we set sail to Paynesville. This is a 29 Km journey of about 5 hrs depending on the wind so a break mid point at Metung. Snowy handled the sailing very well and I have to confess that the boat was travelling at about 6 to 7 knots and the excitement of the heal was certainly invigorating. Snowy stayed between my feet, sometimes he wanted to sit right next to me and sometimes he wanted to lay on his bed in the cabin. It was really good. After the break at Metung that included a nice walk around we set off to Paynesville. Again the sailing was terrific. We rounded Montague Point and a hundred or so metres afterwards I began the process of slowing the boat. First the genoa was furled. During this process I was talking with Snowy to keep him calm. (Read and keep myself calm. :lol: ) I then kicked the outboard on and left it on a slow idle. I began pulling the main sail down fixed it in the usual way and satisfied I stepped back and looked around for Snowy. Hello? not on the deck. Oh it's OK he jumped into the cabin to escape the noise. Peeked into the cabin, HE'S NOT THERE!!!. Oh no I drowned my father's dog. To the amazement of my friends at the jetty I did a U turn. I could not see Snowy anywhere. I spotted a family fishing about 3 hundred meters away from me. Maybe they saw the dog. So off I went to them, scanning the water as I went. I yelled out, "Have you seen a little white dog in the water?" The woman picked something up, "You mean this little dog?" Relieved I retrieved Snowy and thanked the occupants of the boat with profusion. After that incident Snowy was not as keen to get back on the boat.

A dog life floatation vest is essential whenever a dog is on the boat.


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 Post subject: Re: Cruising with dogs
PostPosted: Oct 22nd, '17, 10:59 
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Hello Peter. We sail a Sonata 7 and have the ships dog - Jack Russell - "Milly" with us. Obviously we can't go to some areas of the Lakes as they are Parks ruled, oh sorry, managed ... but it was our decision to have a dog so we just accept the limitation on our destinations.... Milly wears a harness as opposed to a lead on her collar and is always tethered when up on deck; and if we put our life jackets/vests on then hers is on as well. She knows to change sides when we tack and seems happy enough to be with us although prefers light weather cruising. Have to admit that so do we now and so we just pick our times/days/weather to enjoy the beauty of the area. Milly has had some fake turf in the cockpit when she was younger but seemed to go off using it and now we don't bother. She is pretty much with us 24/7 so we have a fairly good idea of her toileting habits and just ensure they are taken care of before we go out...interesting that she can wait all night but during the day requires empty-ing a bit more often. We just factor in stops on our way if sailing for example from Paynesville to Lakes Entrance.... Seems to work for us and she is such a joy we don't mind a little inconvenience in our boating life.
Cheers,
Sue n Crew


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 Post subject: Re: Cruising with dogs
PostPosted: Oct 22nd, '17, 22:17 
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Lovely stories, thankyou. I sympathise with you Wanton, we often have to have Sandy (Damn Dog) on a lead or she will run instead of getting back in the dinghy. I am glad the mid-night thing does not happen very often, and not while on the boat (yet). Not much floor space in a 6m Jim Young, so Sandy has her own place beside me, but she has started sleeping at the bottom end of Gail's quarter berth. Strange.

The experienced cruisers at "Maggy" said if there is no land available then dogs will hold for up to 3 days before relieving the pressure. It is like learning a new trick, better to start young. I heard of a dog that never left the boat for 3 months. Others have been to the Whitsundays and get walked twice a day as usual, find an isolated spot if you can.

We are in crocodile country here so have not encouraged DD to swim, but she does wear a lifevest when necessary. She does not try to get up on the cabin top, but we have a step-through transom. She barks at waves from a passing fizz-boat as they slap the stern, and is intrigued by the archer-fish in our local lake, they will spit up to 2m and with amazing accuracy if not fed a few titbits. She seems to think barking will help.

We will be back on the lake next week, will give puppy-pads a try, but it may be 7 years too late. I guess in doggy terms she is middle-aged, unlike us, we are definitely grey nomads, too old to learn the error of our ways.

Writing the post on fridges has reminded me we had a dog and a cat on the original Peridot (birthstone for August). But what a different dog. It would be unfair to call her a mongrel, she would react to at least 20 different commands, I don't remember any problems. Memories !

Peter
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 Post subject: Re: Cruising with dogs
PostPosted: Oct 23rd, '17, 21:07 
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Peter Yates wrote:
I assume you are referring to my two hounds! Ann and I are insanely attached to them so they do interfere with sailing quite a lot.

The full story is that until a few years ago, we thought we had found the perfect sailing set-up, being a big, stable, comfy South Coast 25 in mast-up storage at the Gippsland Lakes. Then I developed a health problem that made it very hard for me to sleep on a boat or in a caravan as I needed to walk around in the small hours. So sadly the SC25 had to go and we adopted our second batch of two greyhounds.

Still needing a sailing fix at times, I bought a tiny CAL14 and we continued to rent a dog-friendly house at the lakes which also had a jetty at the bottom of the garden. The dogs could be left unattended for 5 or 6 hours, so we did some day-sailing that way.

Then the rental house became a bit run down and we lashed out and bought a tiny holiday house on Raymond Island instead. Then recently I had another brain fade and bought a lovely Investigator 563 (my third one) and the plan is for it to live at the lakes and the CAL will be the local pottering boat at home. Who knows how that will al work, but it is a plan.

The dogs probably have at least 5 years left in them, so hard to say what we will do when they depart - too far ahead and who knows what my health will be doing by then anyway. But please let me know if you can think of a way to sail with two greyhounds. Somehow I think they might just be the least suitable dogs for sailing, but the most suitable dogs for companionship and exercise as far as we are concerned. So it is a clash of passions and the dogs are winning the war at the moment.

Good luck with your pooch in your efforts to adapt to doggy sailing. :) Plenty of people do manage it - mainly with small dogs.

This image sums up what greyhounds think of yachts.
I am also in the domestic employ of a pair of hounds, Peter, and couldn't agree more about them being some of the best pets around.

Surely to convince them to go sailing with you, all you need to do is put some comfy looking cushions in the cabin, firmly instruct the hounds to stay off them, then look away for two minutes? When you look back, won't there be two greys firmly attached to said cushions?

We're a no dogs on the couch kind of house, definitely...Image

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 Post subject: Re: Cruising with dogs
PostPosted: Oct 23rd, '17, 21:33 
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Our first set of three greyhounds started with us about 15 years ago when we wanted a young friend for our aged Sheltie. Tyler, our first hound was so good, we have never considered any other breed. He and his two girlfriends did in fact take over any vacant couch or comfy chair and we gave up trying to stop it happening. We did draw the line at hopping onto beds although one old girl did push that envelope at times too.

Amazingly, our second batch of hounds have never attempted to hop onto any furniture and we haven't encouraged it. The only difference we can think of is that these two were racers and they have doggie beds in almost every room whereas the previous ones were failed racers and there were less beds strewn about for them.

So we don't cruise with dogs at all. Travelling the 400kms to the lakes for us involves the back of the Territory being filled with greyhounds and their gear with a small TS full of our luggage trailing behind. With the CAL14, that hardly affects the fuel economy and we split our time between doggie activities and day-sailing. Ann is sometimes glad to be rid of me, so she stays with the dogs and I can sail on longer trips than a few hours.

Great to see that other TSPers also have hounds in the family. I know INMA has a hound family but don't know of others as yet.

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 Post subject: Re: Cruising with dogs
PostPosted: Oct 24th, '17, 13:33 
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If you cruise the Murrumbidgee River in a land yacht you may come across this chair.
Damn Dog (Sandy)Image

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 Post subject: Re: Cruising with dogs
PostPosted: Oct 24th, '17, 14:10 
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Sorry about the rotation, it looked good before I posted it. Will stick to landscape in future. DD does not have any siblings, just cousins. Found this one at Alice Springs, also in a land yacht.
PeterImage

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 Post subject: Re: Cruising with dogs
PostPosted: Oct 24th, '17, 14:48 
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Our bloke used to come every where. He died a four years ago and the new bloke has not been on the boat yet.

But he loved the boat, loved duck arm where he would hide in the bushes, and through his ball overboard when sailing if we were not watching.

Yes, there are places we could not go on the lakes but that satisfied us. Our favourite spot is Plover Point anyway.

Life jacket was always on when away from the dock.


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 Post subject: Re: Cruising with dogs
PostPosted: Oct 24th, '17, 14:51 
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Let's face it, we take on the role of pack leader when we get them and their main goal then is to be with us, even if it means putting up with a bouncing, leaning boat.

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